Course Offerings

Summer 2022

For most recent listings, see the Registrar's Catalog

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1000 Level Courses

HISTORY 1100. SURVEY OF AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865. (First Four Week). Introduction to U.S. history through the Civil War, surveying political, economic, social, and cultural development of the American people. No credit will be given to students who have received credit in History 1400 (AP credit for U.S. History).

HISTORY 1200. SURVEY OF AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1865. (Second Four Week). Introduction to U.S. history since 1865, surveying political, economic, social, and cultural development of the American people. No credit will be given to students who have received credit in History 1400 (AP credit for U.S. History).

HISTORY 1200. SURVEY OF AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1865. (Eight Week Session). Introduction to U.S. history since 1865, surveying political, economic, social, and cultural development of the American people. No credit will be given to students who have received credit in History 1400 (AP credit for U.S. History).

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2000 Level Courses

HISTORY 2210. TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICA. (First Four Week). This course examines the twentieth century in the United States, focusing on the political, social, and cultural changes that took place during that century. Through lectures, readings, and videos, the class will explore how and why the United States evolved from a rural agricultural nation into an urban industrial one by the outbreak of World War II, and then into a suburban nation during the last half of the twentieth century. The class will also examine how the United States became a military and economic superpower, and the social and cultural movements that sprung up in response to the changes in American life during the twentieth century. Exams and papers: Grades will be based on reading summaries, quizzes, and written exams. Readings: To be announced. Instructor: C. Forrest; ARR Internet

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3000 Level Courses

HISTORY 3545. WORLD WAR II. (Eight Week Session). Examines the origins, conduct, and consequences of the Second World War from a transnational perspective, with an emphasis on the wartime experience and occupation regimes of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan. Course materials analyze the political, military, cultural, and economic factors that shaped the nature of the war as an ideological struggle and a clash of empires. Special attention paid to assessing historical interpretations of the topic and dispelling common myths that surround it. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Professor: B. Nichols; ARR Internet

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4000 Level Courses

HISTORY 4230. OUR TIMES: UNITED STATES SINCE 1945. (Second Four Week). Through lectures, discussions, readings, and media, this course will explore significant developments in American life from 1945 to the end of the Cold War, including America’s role in the world, domestic policy, social movements, and cultural developments. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Instructor: C. Deutsch; ARR Internet

 

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Senior Seminars

Fall 2022

For most recent listings, see the Registrar's Catalog

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1000 Level Courses

HISTORY 1100. SURVEY OF AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865. Introduction to U.S. history through the Civil War, surveying political, economic, social and cultural development of the American people. No credit will be given to students who have received credit in History 1400 (AP credit for U.S. History).

HISTORY 1200. SURVEY OF AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1865. Introduction to U.S. history since 1865, surveying political, economic, social, and cultural development of the American people. No credit will be given to students who have received credit in History 1400 (AP credit for U.S. History).

HISTORY 1500. FOUNDATIONS OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION. A general introduction to major themes in the Western cultural heritage from the origin of civilization in the ancient Near East to the breakdown of traditional European society in the late 18th century. Designed to give a broad background for general education, and to be a sound foundation for further study not only in history but also in other social science and humanities fields. Exams and papers: Three-unit exams (no comprehensive final); three short papers (= 2-3 pages each) based on assigned readings; participation in weekly discussion sections. Readings: To be announced. Professor: J. Frymire; 10:00-10:50 MW

HISTORY 1520. INTRODUCTION TO THE ANCIENT WORLD. This lecture course will explore the development of some of the earliest civilizations of Asia, North Africa, and Europe until the collapse of the western Roman Empire in the late 5th century. These civilizations include the prominent societies of Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Israel, Greece, and Rome. The course focuses on several central themes which include the emergence of cities and states, legal codes and the organization of ancient societies, the nature of kingship, the evolution of religious expression, social hierarchies and gender, the nature of empire as a political system, military history, and the evolution of slavery in the ancient world. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Professor: J. Stevens; 11:00-11:50 MWF

HISTORY 1850. LATIN AMERICA SINCE INDEPENDENCE. “Latin America” is a broad term that does disservice to the diverse character of the countries of Central and South America (Mexico and the Caribbean included). This is most clear during the two centuries of history that follow the independence of most of the region’s nations in the early 19th century. This course will explore the economic, social, political, and cultural history of the national period in Latin America (roughly 1810 to the present). The course employs a mixed approach, both chronological and thematic. Special emphasis will be placed on social and political movements seeking to liberate the residents of Latin America from injustice and poverty-attempts to make real the promise of independence. Format: Lectures and discussion. Exams and papers: One exam, one written paper, ten short written assignments, and fifteen reading quizzes. Readings: Three books. Professor: R. Smale; 9:00-9:50 MWF

HISTORY 1871. HISTORY OF CHINA IN MODERN TIMES. Since COVID-19, China has been perceived as a grave threat to the free world and the current global system. How did we get to this point? How much do we really know about China? What is the source of its dictatorial regime and human rights abuses? Why is it incapable of transforming to a more progressive and open system like other East Asian societies, such as South Korea, Japan, or Taiwan? How did an ancient civilization steeped in Confucian traditions and virtues developed into a revolutionary communist state in the mid-twentieth century? What is the role played by the United States and other foreign powers in shaping this development? The answers to these questions lie in history. History 1871 is an introductory level course that examines China’s difficult path to modernity since the 17th century. Prior knowledge of China or Asia is not required. Our journey starts with China’s last two imperial dynasties (Ming and Qing). It ends with the People’s Republic of China and the troubled US-China relations in recent years. Class format consists of lectures, workshops, and film sessions. Coursework and Evaluation: Exams 50%, assignments 30%, attendance 20%. Readings: To be announced. Professor: D. Yang; 12:00-12:50 MWF

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2000 Level Courses

HISTORY 2004.1. INTRODUCTION TO LATINX STUDIES. (2nd 8-week course). In this class students will develop a body of knowledge about Latinxs, their communities, their struggles, and their goals using both primary and secondary sources. Students will come to distinguish the past from our very different present and to recognize the connections between them. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Professor: D. Cohen; ARR Internet.

HISTORY 2004.2. HISTORY OF MUSEUMS. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced.Professor: E. Holmes; 2:00-2:50 MWF.  

HISTORY 2100. THE REVOLUTIONARY TRANSFORMATION OF AMERICA. (Same as Constitutional Democracy 2100). This course covers the causes, course, and consequences of the American Revolution. Our readings and discussion will push us to see the Revolution not as a straightforward march towards American independence, but rather as a complex series of interrelated political, military, social, economic, and cultural events that unfolded across the larger 18th century world. Students will engage with both primary sources and scholarly assessments as they reconstruct the origins and outcomes of the Revolution from wide-ranging perspectives. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Instructor: TBD 12:30-1:45 TTh

HISTORY 2120. THE YOUNG REPUBLIC. (Same as Constitutional Democracy 2120). This course invites students to explore the early years of the United States. The start of a new nation joined many Americans together in a common nation-building cause. But it also posed a set of deep, often divisive, questions: How powerful should the Federal government really be? What would American values consist of? And who, exactly, were “the People” for whom the Constitution claimed to speak? By abandoning our preconceptions about the nation's early history, this course challenges students recover the political, social, and cultural worlds of its diverse inhabitants and to articulate how and why the history of the Young Republic remains an animating force in the United States today. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Professor: Coleman; 9:30-10:45 TR 

HISTORY 2120H. THE YOUNG REPUBLIC. (Must be eligible for Honors Standing and Same as Constitutional Democracy 2120H). This course examines the early years of the United States. Our focus will be on abandoning our preconceptions about the nation's early history and thoroughly understanding the contingencies, crises, and challenges that faced the American Founders after 1776. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Professor: J. Pasley; 3:30-4:45 TTh

HISTORY 2150. THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR: A GLOBAL HISTORY. In this class students will study the American Civil War from the perspective of global history. The familiar actors and events will be covered – the debate over slavery, the secession of the South, the rise of Abraham Lincoln, the great battles and generals, etc. But these familiar episodes will take on different meanings when viewed in relation to global structures of politics, economics, social relations, and ideology. The 1860s was at once a formative moment in the history of globalization the key decade for the formation and consolidation of modern and nations. There are two objectives to this class: first, to expose undergraduates to the historical, political, and moral education that the Civil War offers all of its students; and second, to introduce students to the enterprise of global history through a familiar and particularly illuminating historical event. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Professor: J. Sexton; 2:00-3:15 TTh

HISTORY 2210. TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICA. Through a combination of lectures, readings, and occasional films, this course surveys the previous century in United States History, including political, social, and cultural developments. Grades will be based on exams and quizzes. Readings: A textbook and supplemental paperbacks. Instructor: C. Deutsch; 9:30-10:45 TTh

 HISTORY 2220. AMERICA IN THE 1960’s. This course examines the political and cultural currents in America during the 1960s, specifically the cultural challenges presented by groups protesting for equality in American society. The course will look at the history of the 1950s and how that decade set the stage for the changes of the 1960s. It will also focus on several specific groups pushing for change: African Americans, college students, women, Native Americans, and others. The final section of the course will examine the legacy of the 1960s on the decade of the 1970s and beyond. Overarching themes of this course include: the Cold War, suburbanization, the Civil Rights Movement, student movements, and the radicalization of protest movements by the end of the 1960s. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Instructor: C. Forrest; 10:00-11:40 MWF

HISTORY 2240. FLIGHT IN AMERICA: FROM THE WRIGHT BROTHERS TO THE SPACE AGE. This course focuses on the history of flying in the U.S. from its beginnings to the Apollo moon missions. In a little over a century, aviation and space flight have transformed our world. We will focus on key innovations and the people behind them. This is an exciting story, full of fascinating men and women. There are a lot of great videos and films about flight, and we will use excerpts from these in class. Exams and papers: Grades will be based on weekly quizzes, class discussion, and an optional take-home final. Readings: Weekly reading assignments. Professor: J. Wigger; 1:00-1:50 MWF

HISTORY 2560. MODERN MILITARY HISTORY. (Same as Peace Studies 2560). Explores the development of warfare around the world from circa 1300 to the present. Course materials devote equal attention to operational military history (combat, strategy, tactics, weapons systems, etc.) and the study of war and society (the various ways in which armed conflict impacts and reflects life beyond the battlefield). Additional focus on issues of cultural representation and historical memory. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: Jeremy Black, War and the World: Military Power and the Fate of Continents, 1450-2000; Michael Howard, War in European History and John A. Lynn, Battle: A History of Combat and Culture. Professor: B. Nichols; 12:00-12:50 MWF

HISTORY 2590. EPIDEMICS AND SOCIETY. Survey of epidemic diseases from the ancient to modern eras, focusing on both the factors giving rise to specific diseases and how different societies have understood and responded to them. Traces the connections of epidemic diseases to globalization, examining links between epidemics and warfare, exploration, colonization, and trade networks. The course will conclude with a discussion of newly emerging diseases in the contemporary world. Exams and papers: Two exams, two analytical papers and a research bibliography. Readings: Textbook, two monographs and additional readings online (Canvas). Professor: K. Wilson-Bowers; 3:00-3:50 MWF

HISTORY 2700. HISTORY OF PIRATES: MARITIME RAIDING FROM THE ANCIENT TO THE MODERN ERAS. Pirates have taken on many different forms, from the heroic raider of ancient societies to the privateers who served as informal naval forces attacking enemy ships. In many of these guises, pirates have captured the popular imagination and today remain a romanticized staple of Hollywood. Beyond the romantic ideal exists a grim and violent reality. Men and women have turned to piracy when they had few other options, and often paying the price of a very brutal and short life. For the rest of society, piracy posed a significant economic threat as well as a threat to all those who traveled by sea - sailors, traders, pilgrims, settlers, merchants, and administrators.

This is a broad survey of piracy around the globe from the ancient to the modern world, with a particular focus on the 15th through the 18th centuries. We will be examining the motivations for and effects of piracy in Mediterranean Sea, and the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. Exams and papers: Two exams, two short papers, weekly reading responses, research project. Readings: Wadsworth, Global Piracy: A Documentary History of Seaborne Banditry; Hanna, Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire; Rediker, Villains of All Nations. Professor: K. Bowers; 2:00-2:50 MWF

HISTORY 2950.1. SOPHOMORE SEMINAR: RESEARCHING THE SPANISH CONQUEST OF THE AMERICAS. This course introduces students to the skills and techniques used in historical research and writing. Students will learn how to work with different types of sources, locate and read appropriate primary and secondary sources for their work, ask historical questions, think, and write historically, and structure an original research project. Although content is less important than skill-building in this course, the content of the course will consist of an exploration of Spanish expansion in the Americas in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Exams and papers: One longer written assignment, ten short written assignments, fifteen reading quizzes. Readings: Four books. Professor: R. Smale; 10:00-10:50 MWF

HISTORY 2950.2. HISTORICAL METHODS: AFRICAN ORAL HISTORIES. As Linda Shopes writes: “Oral history is both a process (doing an interview) and a product (the recorded interview); both a document (a source of information/data) and a text (a construction of memory and language); both fun (listening to another person’s story) and challenging (making sense of another person’s story). It is a form of first-person, personal narrative, both similar to and different from other forms of first-person narrative, including ethnography, storytelling, and memoir.” Historians of Africa have pioneered innovative methods of process, product, document, and text when it comes to oral history. They have also raised important conceptual and ethical questions when it comes to this form of historical documentation, too. In this seminar, students will learn about African oral history and theory, practice interpreting oral history interviews, while also executing oral histories themselves. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Professor: M. Fejzula; 11:00-12:15 TTh

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3000 Level Courses

HISTORY 3010. COLONIAL AMERICA. This course invites students to think about the origins of American history through a combination of lectures, readings, and projects. Throughout the course of the semester, we will encounter famous leaders, troublesome women, rebellious slaves, a few witches, at least one cannibal, and a host of other colonial Americans (both famous and obscure) as we grapple with a people who became increasingly attached to both liberty and slavery. Exams and papers: Two papers, quizzes, midterm, and final exam. Readings: Two books, other articles and primary sources as assigned. Professor: M. Morris; 2:00-3:15 TTh

HISTORY 3410. History of Black Nationalism in the U.S. Black Nationalism in the United States has most recently been associated with either the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, the Nation of Islam or the Black Power Movement of the 1960s. While each of these are components of Black Nationalism, it has a much longer history in this country that dates to the late eighteenth century. This course will examine the history of Black people advancing several self-sufficient strategies such as constructing autonomous institutions, building all Black communities or acquiring an independent nation-state. The course will also investigate the ideology, structure, strategy and tactics of Black Nationalism along with the organizations and people that helped to shape Black nationalist thought. Exams and papers: Weekly 1-page reflection papers, two essays and one group research project. Readings: Four texts and several articles. Professor: M. Gipson; 2:00-3:15 TR

HISTORY 3505. HISTORY OF ANCIENT EGYPT. This lecture course will explore the rise of ancient Egyptian civilization from its prehistoric origins to the late 1000’s BCE. Such an expansive survey of the world of the ancient pharaohs will emphasize diverse source materials related to some of the most significant social, political, and religious developments to impact Egyptian society from the great pyramid building dynasties of the Old Kingdom to the periods of dynamic expansion under prominent New Kingdom pharaohs. Topics include: the unification and formation of the Egyptian state; the role of the Pharaoh in society; Egyptian mythology and religion; the role of the pyramids and mummification in society, developments in science and technology, female pharaohs, the archaeology of ancient Egypt and recent discoveries, including the legacy and reception of ancient Egypt in modernity. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Professor: J. Stevens; 3:30-4:45 TTh

HISTORY 3550. SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL EUROPE. This course explores how ancient observations and theories about the natural world and the human body led to the development of "natural philosophy" and medicine as fields of expertise. We will be examining attitudes and beliefs about the natural world and man's place within it from Egyptian-Babylonian roots through the Middle Ages. Exams and papers: Two exams, two short papers, research paper. Readings: Textbook and two paperback monographs. Professor: K. Wilson-Bowers; 11:00-11:50 MWF

HISTORY 3620. BRITAIN AND THE SEA. (2nd 8-week course). This is a history of modern Britain, told through its relationship with the sea. Each week of the course examines a different theme in British history, refracted through the ‘Home Waters’ of north-west Europe, or the wider Atlantic, Indian, Arctic and Pacific Oceans of Britain’s overseas empire. Drawing on literature and film as well as history and politics, and covering episodes from the Napoleonic Wars to Brexit, the course focuses on the century between 1850 and 1950. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: G. O’Hara, Britain and the Sea since 1600; J. Peck, Maritime Fiction: sailors and the sea in British and American novels, 1790-1917 and M. Taylor (ed.), The Victorian Empire and Britain's Maritime World, 1837-1901: The Sea and Global History. Professor: R. Fletcher; 2:00-4:20 TTh

 

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4000 Level Courses

HISTORY 4400. HISTORY OF AMERICAN LAW. (Same as Constitutional Democracy 4400). American law from English origins to present. Reviews common law, codification, legal reform movements, slavery law, administrative state, formalism, legal realism, jurisprudential questions concerning rule of law. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Instructor: TBD; 2:00-3:15 TTh

HISTORY 4520. THE RISE AND FALL OF THE ROMAN REPUBLIC TO THE DEATH OF JULIUS CAESER. This course will explore the rise and fall of the Roman Republic from the mythical accounts of the foundation of the city (ca. 753 BC), down through the death of Julius Caesar (44 BC), ultimately culminating in the early emergence of the ‘Principate’ under the Emperor Augustus in the late
1st century BC. The historical focus will be on the series of political, legal, and social revolutions that shaped the evolution of the Roman Republic, with special emphasis placed upon the ‘Roman Revolution’ that transformed the Roman state from 133-27 BC. Specific topics of exploration will include the reforms of the Gracchi, the emergence of political violence within the Roman system, the transformation of the Roman military under powerful generals like Marius and Sulla, the rebellion of Spartacus, the rise and fall of Julius Caesar, and the implementation of the imperial system under Augustus. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Professor: J. Stevens; 11:00-12:15 TTh

HISTORY 4630. THE AGE OF THE RENAISSANCE. This class will explore the major changes in European economic, social, political, religious, and intellectual life between 1250-1500. We will examine Humanism and Renaissance as well as the “Renaissance problem.” Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Professor: J. Frymire; 6:00-8:20 T

HISTORY 4685.THE HOLOCAUST. (Same as Peace Studies 4685). Provides a historical account, psychological analysis, and philosophical contemplation of the Holocaust. Examines the Nazi regime's systematic attempt to exterminate the Jews of Europe along with a number of additional population groups. Course is organized around the use of primary sources: written texts, photographs, films, and oral testimony. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced. Professor: B. Nichols; 2:00-2:50 MWF

HISTORY 4880. CHINESE MIGRATION: FROM YELLOW PERIL TO MODEL MINORITY. History 4880 is a seminar course that discusses racism, xenophobia, social inequality, and immigration restrictions in the United States through the lens of Chinese Americans and other Asians. Anti-Asian/Asian- Chinese racism is on the rise since the COVID-19 outbreak. Yet the complex history of Chinese in the United States remains obscured in current public debate dominated by the division between black and white Americans. First perceived as the “Yellow Peril” in the nineteenth century and then lauded contradictorily as a “model minority” by the second half of the twentieth century, Chinese migrants are actually the key to understand American ideas of racial stereotypes, imperialism, and globalization. More importantly, the historical debates that revolved around Chinese immigration restrictions were crucial for the development of the current merit-based immigration system in the United States. This course introduces readings and films that illuminate this little-known yet essential part of American history. Taking a transnational and comparative perspective, it also brings in studies that examine Chinese diaspora in other parts of the world. The class format consists of seminar discussions and in-class work. Course work and Evaluation: Two in- class presentations (30%); one final research paper (30%); attendance (20%); seminar participation (20%). Readings: To be announced. Professor: D. Yang; 3:00-3:50 MWF

 

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Senior Seminars

THESE COURSES ARE RESTRICTED TO HISTORY MAJORS ONLY AND REQUIRE DEPARTMENT CONSENT*

ALL SEMINARS ARE WRITING INTENSIVE

HISTORY 4972W. OIL AND ENERGY. This seminar examines the history of oil and other fossil fuels in American history. Understanding the evolution of energy use over time helps illuminate the history of the American economy, U.S. foreign policy, the growth of cities and suburbs, climate change, and other developments that have shaped today’s world. As a Writing Intensive course, this seminar will include weekly responses to the readings and two longer papers. Students will employ a multi-step writing process, with steps that include developing a preliminary version of their arguments in outlines and rough drafts, incorporating feedback, revising, and creating polished final drafts. Exams and papers: Weekly reading responses and two papers with a multi-step revision process. Readings: To be announced. Professor: V. McFarland; 3:00-5:20 W