Course Offerings

Spring 2023

 

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1000 Level Courses

HISTORY 1100. SURVEY OF AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865. (Honors Option Available).

Introduction to U.S. history through the Civil War, surveying the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the American people. No credit will be given to students who have received credit in HIST 1400 (AP credit for US History).

 

HISTORY 1200. SURVEY OF AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1865. (Honors Option Available).

Introduction to U.S. history since 1865, surveying political, economic, social, and cultural development of the American people. No credit will be given to students who have received credit in HIST 1400 (AP credit for US History).

 

HISTORY 1410. AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY. (Same as Black Studies 1410). This introductory course surveys African-American history from the 15th century to the present. The course will provide an overview of major events throughout African American history framed by the Long Black Freedom Struggle. These events will include the trans-Atlantic slave trade, chattel slavery in the United States, the Civil War and emancipation, Reconstruction and the New Negro Era, Jim Crow Era, the Great Depression, and World War II, the modern Civil Rights Movement, the Black Power Movement, and the Obama years. 

Professor: M. Gipson
Time: 2:00-3:15 T/Th
Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings: To be announced

 

HISTORY 1510. HISTORY OF MODERN EUROPE. (Honors Option Available). European history from the French Revolution to the present. During the period of this course, the western world was transformed from a traditional, aristocratic, agrarian order to the modern industrial society in which we live today. This transformation resulted in a succession of major societal crises that caused intense conflict between 1789 and 1914, and between 1914 and 1945, and virtually tore the fabric of civilization apart. We will explore this traumatic transformation in all its social, economic, and political aspects, focusing on industrialization, class conflict, imperialism, fascism, two world wars, the rise of mass democracy, and the coming of the welfare state.

Professor: L. Reeder
Time: 10:00-10:50 M/W
Exams and papers: to be determined
Readings: to be announced

 

HISTORY 1840. COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA. Surveys the economic, social, political, and cultural history of Latin America before 1810. Beginning with a detailed discussion of the pre-Columbian Indian civilizations and climaxing with the Haitian Revolution and rumblings of discontent in Spanish and Portuguese colonial possessions, it demands a rigorous study of primary sources to get at the lived experiences of Latin American residents. Applying a mixed approach to the region, both chronological and thematic, the class will place special emphasis on the multi-cultural character of colonial Latin American history–African, Native American, and European. The course seeks both to sharpen the student's understanding of the region and to stimulate an appreciation for the techniques of historical inquiry and analysis. 

Professor: R. Smale
Time: 9:00-9:50 M/W/F

Exams and papers: One exam, one paper, twelve short comments, and ten quizzes
Readings: Four texts

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2000 Level Courses

HISTORY 2004.1. TOPICS IN HISTORY: THE LIFE, TIMES, AND REMEMBRANCE OF SALLY HEMINGS. Who was Sally Hemings? For nearly two centuries, despite her connection to Thomas Jefferson being evident in the documentary record, historians and others chose to ignore or obscure this woman who played a central, if silent, role in the life of the third president of the United States. As recently as 2008, docents at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello refused to acknowledge Jefferson’s paternity of Hemings’s children and in 2012, the Wall Street Journal published an opinion piece from a UVA professor and the editor of The Jefferson-Hemings Controversy: Report of the Scholars Commission denying both the DNA and documentary evidence. But in 2020, any historian writing about Thomas Jefferson must (at least) acknowledge Sally Hemings, drawing a stark contrast between the elite white man whose papers fill more than 44 printed volumes and the enslaved, mixed-race woman who left behind no words of her own. In this course, through the lens of Sally Hemings, we will consider the lived experiences of enslaved women during the colonial and revolutionary eras and what centering their stories can tell us about the social, cultural, political, and economic structures that produced the United States of America.

Instructor: E. Holmes
Time: 3:30-4:45 T/Th 
Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings: To be announced 

 

HISTORY 2100H.2. THE REVOLUTIONARY TRANSFORMATION OF AMERICA. (Must be eligible for Honors Standing; Same as Constitutional Democracy 2100H.2). This course covers the causes, course, and consequences of the American Revolution. Our readings and discussion will push us to see the Revolution not as a straightforward march towards American independence, but rather as a complex series of interrelated political, military, social, economic, and cultural events that unfolded across the larger eighteenth-century world. Students will engage with both primary sources and scholarly assessments as they reconstruct the origins and outcomes of the Revolution from wide-ranging perspectives. 

Professor: A. Reichardt
Time: 3:30-4:45 T/Th  
Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings: To be announced

 

HISTORY 2120H. THE YOUNG REPUBLIC. (Must be eligible for Honors Standing; Same as Constitutional Democracy 2120H). This course examines the early years of the United States. Our focus will be on abandoning our preconceptions about the nation's early history and thoroughly understanding the contingencies, crises, and challenges that faced the American people after 1783

Instructor: A. Twitty
Time: 12:30-1:45 T/Th 

Exams and papers: To be determined 
Readings: 
To be announced

 

HISTORY 2210. TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICA. This course examines the twentieth century in the United States, focusing on the political, social, and cultural changes that took place during that century. Through lectures, readings, and videos, the class will explore how and why the United States evolved from a rural agricultural nation into an urban industrial one by the outbreak of World War II, and then into a suburban nation during the last half of the twentieth century. The class will also examine how the United States became a military and economic superpower, and the social and cultural movements that sprung up in response to the changes in American life during the twentieth century. 

Instructor: C. Forrest
Time: 2:00-2:50 M/W/F

Exams and papers: Grades will be based on reading summaries, quizzes, and written exams
Readings: To be announced

 

HISTORY 2422. NATURE’S NATION: DISEASE, DISASTER, AND ECOLOGY IN AMERICAN HISTORY. This course provides an introduction to the complicated, contested, and fascinating relationship between the environment, humans, and historical change in North America. The course combines a traditional lecture format with intensive analysis of film, advertisements, art, music, policy, environmental philosophy, economic theory, and major works of environmental history. It also incorporates field exercises and service learning to deepen our understanding of the role of “nature” in shaping local history. 

ProfessorJ. Frank
Time: 10:00-10:50 M/W/F

Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings: To be announced 

 

 

HISTORY 2440. HISTORY OF MISSOURI. Surveys the history of Missouri and its region from the Mississippian mound builders to modern times, sketching the changing character of the region’s society, economy, culture, and politics across the centuries. Particular attention will be paid to Missouri’s involvement in major national events (e.g., the Revolution, the conquest of the West, and the Civil War), the development of its major cities (especially St. Louis and Kansas City), and the surprisingly crucial Missouri roots of modern American popular culture. 

Professor: J. Pasley
Time:11:00-11:50 M/W/F

Exams and papers: Mid-term, final, and “Hometown History” research paper
Readings: To be announced

 

HISTORY 2560. MODERN MILITARY HISTORY. (Same as Peace Studies 2560). Explores the development of warfare around the world from circa 1300 to the present. Course materials devote equal attention to operational military history (combat, strategy, tactics, weapons systems, etc.) and the study of war and society (the various ways in which armed conflict impacts and reflects life beyond the battlefield). Additional focus on issues of cultural representation and historical memory. 

Professor: B. Nichols
Time: 2:00-3:15 T/Th

Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings:
Jeremy Black, War and the World: Military Power and the Fate of Continents, 1450-2000; Michael Howard, War in European History and John A. Lynn, Battle: A History of Combat and Culture.

 

HISTORY 2590. EPIDEMICS AND SOCIETY. (1st 8-weeks class). Survey of epidemic diseases from

the ancient to modern eras, focusing on both the factors giving rise to specific diseases and how different societies have understood and responded to them. Traces the connections of epidemic diseases to globalization, examining links between epidemics and warfare, exploration, colonization, and trade networks. The course will conclude with a discussion of newly emerging diseases in the contemporary world. 

Professor: K. Wilson-Bowers
Time: 10:00-11:30 M/W/F

Exams and papers: Three essay exams, weekly short writings, and a brief group presentation based on individual research
Readings: Textbook; two monographs; additional readings online (Canvas)

 

HISTORY 2950.1. SOPHOMORE SEMINAR: NATURAL DISASTERS IN EUROPE, 1300-1700. (Consent of the Department Required. Please email Brittony Hein-corneillierb@missouri.edu, Sr. Academic Advisor for Permission Number). Recently we’ve witnessed to return of diseases and disasters on a global scale that was unimaginable as late as the 1980s: HIV/AIDS, Covid, tsunamis, drought, and increasingly violent storms such as hurricanes. This course will examine natural disasters in premodern Europe: their types and frequencies, how governments (including the Church) and ordinary people managed them, how people explained them religiously and scientifically, and how they impacted populations in the short- and long term. We will do this in ways that teach students fundamental historical skills such as reading primary and secondary sources, conducting research, establishing bibliographies, critically reviewing articles and books, and creating research conceptualizations. 

ProfessorJ. Frymire
Time: 11:00-12:15 T/Th

Exams and papers: No exams in the traditional sense; reader responses, short reviews, bibliographies, and the development of a research project proposal (conceptualization, not a complete research paper). 
Readings: primary sources, book chapters, and articles. To be announced

 

 

HISTORY 2950.2. SOPHOMORE SEMINAR: LIVING IN MODERN EUROPE. (Consent of the Department Required. Please email Brittony Hein-corneillierb@missouri.edu, Sr. Academic Advisor for Permission Number). What does it mean to research and write like a historian?  In this seminar, we will explore this question through the study of five (5) key topics of Modern European History:  The French Revolution, Industrialization, the Rise of Modern Science, Commodity Culture & Empire, and the First World War.  Throughout the course, students will be exposed to a wide range of people living in this period in order to reflect upon the diversity of experience.  Students will learn tools with which to analyze primary documents and scholarly sources to understand what life was like for people living in Europe and its empires between 1789 and 1918. This Sophomore Seminar seeks to prepare students for upper-level history courses that require research papers. Throughout the semester, students will gain skills in locating historical sources (both online and at Ellis Library), developing clear and persuasive arguments, and organizing research papers that are based on primary documents. Each student will take on a research project on a subject of their choice pertaining to the scope of the course.  They will undertake this project through a variety of steps:  attending a library workshop, submitting an annotative bibliography, and developing a research proposal.  Each week, students will also participate in the course’s Canvas Discussion Board. 

ProfessorI. Karthas
Time: 3:00-5:20 W

Exams and papers: To be determined 
Readings: To be announced

 

 

 

 

 

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3000 Level Courses

HISTORY 3515. PTOLEMAIC EGYPT: ALEXANDER THE GREAT TO CLEOPATRA. The core of this course explores the history of Egypt under the Ptolemaic Dynasty (323-30 BC), founded by Alexander’s bodyguard Ptolemy, which lasted until the death of Cleopatra VII and the annexation of Egypt by the future Roman emperor Augustus (30 BC). In order to provide sufficient context for the Ptolemaic period, however, some early portions of the course will include a brief overview survey of ancient Egypt and its rulers from Old Kingdom to the New Kingdom, continuing with some emphasis on the 1st millennium BC changes down to Late Period Egypt under Persian rule. The course will shift to the rise of Alexander the Great and the eventual establishment of the Ptolemaic Dynasty. The primary focus of the course is political and military history, but various social and economic aspects of Egyptian society are also considered, as well as the literary and scientific output of scholars at Alexandria, the intellectual center of the Hellenistic world. Topics include: the legacy of old Egypt in the Hellenistic period, Alexander the Great’s conquest of Persia (including Egypt) and his influence on the Successors; the establishment of the Ptolemaic dynasty by Ptolemy, the reigns of Ptolemy I to Cleopatra VII, with special focus on Cleopatra VII; Egyptian society; Alexandria; and Cleopatra in the context of Roman imperialism. 

ProfessorJ. Stevens
Time: 3:30-4:45 T/Th

Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings: To be announced

 

HISTORY 3545. WORLD WAR II. Examines the origins, conduct, and consequences of the Second World War from a transnational perspective, with an emphasis on the wartime experience and occupation regimes of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan. Course materials analyze the political, military, cultural, and economic factors that shaped the nature of the war as an ideological struggle and a clash of empires. Special attention paid to assessing historical interpretations of the topic and dispelling common myths that surround it. 

Professor: B. Nichols
Time: 3:30-4:45 T/Th
Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings: To be announced

 

HISTORY 3560. THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION, 1550-1800. This course covers the development of science (or “natural philosophy”) from the late Renaissance through the Enlightenment. This was an era of intellectual ferment and change that gave rise to new ideas about the natural world and how to understand it. This course will examine various aspects of this shift, including intellectual (experiment and demonstration), social (scientific societies), technological (new instruments and uses of mathematics), economic (links of colonization and science) changes. 

Professor: K. Bowers
Time:1:00-1:50 M/W/F

Exams and papers: Two exams, a book review, and a research paper
Readings: Three books; additional readings online

 

 

HISTORY 3600. THE LATER MIDDLE AGES. The course covers Europe from about the mid-11th 

until the 15th century. We will see European society recovering from a long period of external invasion, disintegrating political authority, and declining population, all the while maintaining a sense of shared historical traditions, a commonly learned language, and an increasingly unified religious tradition. This period saw the birth of major institutions such as representative assemblies, centralized monarchies, civic governments and worker’s guilds, universities, and religious orders. A major part of the course will entail the critical examination of primary sources as we seek to understand how European cultural and political identity developed during these centuries.  

Professor: L. Huneycutt
Time: 11:00-11:50 M/W/F

Exams and papers: Several short papers, an interactive project, and graded participation on the assigned discussion board. 
Readings: Clifford Backman, The Worlds of Medieval Europe;   Suger, The Deeds of Louis the Fat; Little, Apostolic Poverty and the Profit Economy; ShopkowThe Saint and the Count and Baldwin, The Scholastic Culture of Medieval Europe. About half of the work for this course will be asynchronous, but there will be required participation in Zoom Discussions about once a week (usually on Monday), and there will also be a three-day interactive project that will require attendance and participation. A schedule of required attendance dates will be available by the first day of class.

 

HISTORY 3640. REFORMATIONS AND RELIGIOUS CONFLICTS IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE.

For over 1000 years western Europeans shared the same Christian faith as defined by Roman popes and their theologians. In the wake of late medieval reform movements and Protestant theologians such as Martin Luther and John Calvin, Christian unity was replaced by multiple Christianities. Roman Catholics had their own reformation as well.  We will examine religious thinking and practice (including that of common people) before and after the reformations (ca. 1400-1650), and study religious phenomena in their social, political, and intellectual contexts. We will end by considering the relation of the reformations to the creation of the modern state. 

Professor: J. Frymire
Time: 9:30-10:45 T/Th
Exams and papers: 3 take-home unit exams; 2 short (4-5pp.) essays; 1 book review 
Readings: Textbook, primary source reader, and short supplements provided via Canvas.

 

 

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4000 Level Courses

HISTORY 4070. INDIANS AND EUROPEANS IN EARLY AMERICA. This course examines the intertwined histories of Indigenous and European North Americans, from pre-contact through the mid-nineteenth century. Organized both chronologically and conceptually, we’ll cover key topics and scholarly debates in Euro-Indigenous North American history, including sovereignty, settler colonialism, ethnogenesis, textualities and translation, enslavement, empire, and more. Drawing connections across time and space, we’ll also study broad phenomena and processes of colonization, resistance, and adaptation. 

Professor: A. Reichardt
Time:11:00-12:15 T/Th

Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings: To be announced

 

HISTORY 4075/4075H. GLOBAL HISTORY IN OXFORD. (Must be eligible for Honors Standing; Consent of the Department Required-Must be accepted to Study Abroad Program). This course examines global and transnational history in the ‘modern’ period since 1400. It includes an embedded week of study abroad at Oxford University (United Kingdom) over spring break. The class begins by interrogating how and why national history emerged as the default method of the study of the past in the late 19th and 20th centuries, before considering the limitations of national history. The class then shifts to the emergence of global and transnational approaches, which emerged as potential successors to national history in the decades following the end of the Cold War. Over spring break, the class will convene in the U.K., where students will experience a discussion-intensive week with Oxford faculty. Upon our return to Columbia, students will roll up their sleeves on their research projects. These will be writing intensive projects of 20 pages in which each student will identify a question related to global/transnational history and seek to answer it in essay form after additional reading and thought. 

Professor: J. Sexton
Time: 3:30-5:50 M

Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings: To be announced

 

HISTORY 4260. AGE OF ASCENDANCY: U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS, 1945-PRESENT. (Same as Peace Studies 4260). This course covers the history of American foreign relations from the end of the Second World War until the present day. We will examine the evolution of U.S. foreign policy during this period, its impact on other nations, and the ways in which foreign policy was debated at home. We will also look beyond traditional diplomatic and military affairs to explore a broader set of American interactions with the world, including trade, immigration, and cultural exchange. 

Professor: V. McFarland
9:00-9:50 M/W/F

Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings: To be announced

 

HISTORY 4280. AMERICA IN THE REAGAN ERA. Examines the major political, economic, social, and cultural currents and developments of Stranger Things-era America, or the "Long Eighties," from Jimmy Carter's "malaise speech" of July 1979 to Bill Clinton's mid-1990s embrace of welfare reform and pronouncement that the era of big government was over. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced.

Instructor: C. Deutsch
Time: 10:00-10:50 M/W/F

Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings:
To be announced

 

HISTORY 4530. THE ROMAN EMPIRE. (Honors Option Available). This course will survey the political, social, and military history of the first half of the Roman Empire from the death of Julius Caesar in 44 BC, and the establishment of the ‘Principate’ under Augustus, down through the fall of the Severan Dynasty in the first part of the 3rd century. The course will examine the evolution of the Roman imperial structure and the many ways the various peoples in the provinces navigated daily life within the Roman Empire. Exams and papers: To be determined. Readings: To be announced.

Professor: J. Stevens
Time: 11:00-12:15 T/Th
Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings: To be announced.

 

HISTORY 4650. REVOLUTIONARY FRANCE, 1789-1815. The French Revolution is one of the best-known events and turning points in history, an event with enormous repercussions for both French and world history. The personal dramas, sudden changes of fortunes, and dramatic consequences of the Revolution have inspired innumerable artists, novelists, playwrights, and filmmakers over the centuries. Regarded as the first “social” revolution, it marked a decisive transition in European history, established the “rights of man” as a new ideal of legitimacy, and created the model of the modern nation-state. This course examines the origins, process, and impact of the French Revolution. It will begin by tracing the ancient regime and those structures that the revolutionaries attempted to dismantle. The course will follow with an examination of Enlightenment concepts and their influence on revolutionary fervor. With an understanding of the historical processes leading to revolution, the course will then launch into an investigation of both traditional and more recent interpretations of the Revolution itself. We will conclude with the rise of Napoleon and the establishment of his Empire. 

Professor: I. Karthas
Time: 1:00-1:50 M/W/F
Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings: To be announced 

 

HISTORY 4835. RACE AND POLITICS IN SOUTH AFRICA. (Same as Black Studies 4835; Constitutional Democracy 4835-Must be accepted to Study Abroad Program). This course is about the nexus between race and politics in the history of South Africa Between 1948 and 1994, when race was the formal organizing principle of the South Africa under apartheid. Significantly, democratic South Africa is still grappling with the legacies of racialized rule after the transition to democracy. Organized around seminars, guest lectures and tours, the course introduces students to how scholars have understood race and politics in this Southern African nation. It further examines the social and economic context in which race was deployed as an instrument of making difference and exercising power and how this is contested. 

Professor: M. Fejzula
Time:8:00-9:15 T/Th
Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings: To be announced

 

HISTORY 4910W. HISTORY IN THE PUBLIC: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE THEORY & PRACTICE OF PUBLIC HISTORY. (Department Consent Required and Writing Intensive. Please email Brittony Hein-corneillierb@missouri.edu, Sr. Academic Advisor for Permission Number). This course introduces students to public history, exploring the countless ways that we encounter history every day—whether we’re professional historians, or not. We will examine the production of historical narratives for public audiences, and question how we can more effectively engage with and interpret those narratives. Students will learn about the variety of ways to be a professional historian and learn to put their skills as a historian into practice, using the collections of archives, libraries, and museums to analyze historical evidence and create compelling narratives that appeal to diverse audiences. Students will also confront the issues facing public historians as they do their work, including limited and diminishing resources, changing constituencies, and competing histories. Together, we will explore how historians working in libraries and archives, museums, historic preservation, oral history, and digital history understand, give meaning to, and communicate the past. 

Professor: E. Holmes
Time: 2:00-3:15 T/Th  
Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings: To be announced

 

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Senior Seminars

THESE COURSES ARE RESTRICTED TO HISTORY MAJORS ONLY
DEPARTMENT CONSENT REQUIRED

Please email Brittony Hein-corneillierb@missouri.edu, Sr. Academic Advisor for Permission Number

 

ALL SEMINARS ARE WRITING INTENSIVE

 

HISTORY 4971W.1. MEDIEVAL QUEENSHIP You should expect to turn in some kind of writing nearly every week, leading up to the major assignment for the course, which is an original research paper that will run somewhere between 20 and 25 pages long. The subject matter of the course is medieval queenship, which requires not only biographical knowledge of individual queens, but also of the administrative, legal, cultural, and geographical contexts in which they lived.

Professor: L. Huneycutt
Time: 3:00-5:20 M
Readings: Teresa Earenfight, Medieval Queenship, assigned articles, and a monograph related to your research topic selected in conjunction with the instructor.

 

HISTORY 4971W.2. BRITAIN AND THE MIDDLE EAST, 1914-1945. (Same as Constitutional Democracy 4971W.2). The political map of the Middle East was transformed in the twentieth century. This course examines the critical role that British imperialism played in this process, as the domains of the former Ottoman Empire were divided into the nation-states we know today. In particular, it explores the critical decades of British rule as the ‘mandatory power’ for Palestine, Trans-Jordan and Iraq, in the face of economic depression, ethnic conflict, and anti-colonial nationalism. Topics include: the collapse of Ottoman rule, the First and Second World Wars in the Middle East, the imperial record in government, and the consequences of this key period. E

Professor: R. Fletcher
Time: 2:00-4:20 Th

Exams and papers: To be determined
Readings: To be announced