Promotion and Tenure Information

Information on this page includes:

Department of History Procedures for Promotion and Tenure

Department of History Criteria for Promotion to Tenured Associate Professor

Department of History Criteria for Promotion to Full Professor

Departmental Promotion and Tenure Guidelines, Timelines, Suggestions, and Procedures

Department of History Procedures for Promotion and Tenure

In accordance with the guidelines of the College of Arts and Science, every untenured department member is reviewed in terms of Teaching, Research, and Service every year by a subcommittee of the tenured faculty appointed by the departmental chairperson. This subcommittee confers with the faculty member, reviews publications, manuscripts, and grant proposals, visits classes, and (with the faculty member's consent) consults student evaluations. It then makes a recommendation at a full meeting of the tenured faculty. This recommendation may be to consider the granting of tenure, to renew for an additional one-year term, or to recommend a terminal one year contract. The tenured faculty then discusses this recommendation and votes on it, with the decision being reported to the dean of the College of Arts and Science.

When the subcommittee's report indicates that an untenured faculty member should be considered for tenure, and the tenured faculty accepts that report, the faculty instructs the chairperson to appoint another subcommittee to prepare the papers necessary for promotion and tenure. This subcommittee confers with the candidate for tenure, reviewing with that person the complete record and obtaining any additional information that may be required. Members of the subcommittee are assigned to review all the evidence on Teaching, Research, and Service; and the committee identifies a number of leading scholars in the candidate's special field and requests them to write letters evaluating the quality of the candidate's scholarship and the suitability of the candidate for promotion and tenure. When all this material is in hand, the subcommittee drafts the formal recommendation and submits it to the chairperson and to a meeting of the tenured faculty. The tenured faculty discusses and votes by secret ballot on this recommendation. The vote is recorded, and the result is entered on the cover sheet of the recommendation, as is the individual recommendation of the chairperson. If promotion to a higher rank is involved, only tenured faculty at or above that rank are present for the vote on that question. If promotion and tenure are approved, the recommendation papers are then forwarded to the dean of the College of Arts and Science.

Department of History Criteria for Promotion to Tenured Associate Professor

The History Department at the University of Missouri expects candidates for promotion from assistant to tenured associate professor to meet the following criteria.

  1. Research. The candidate should have one sole-authored, book-length historical study from a reputable publishing house that demonstrates the candidate’s status as an active member of the scholarly community. The candidate’s research should make a significant contribution to the scholarship in his or her field(s) of study.
     
  2. Professional visibility. The candidate should have an ongoing research agenda and should be an active member of the scholarly community outside of the university. This can take many forms, including the following: participation as a presenter and/or commentator in scholarly conferences; the publication of book reviews; and active membership in scholarly organizations and networks.
     
  3. Teaching. The candidate should have an established record of teaching excellence.
     
  4. University Service. The candidate should have an active and developing record of service at the departmental and/or campus levels.  

Department of History Criteria for Promotion to Full Professor

The History Department at the University of Missouri expects candidates for promotion from associate to full professor to meet the following criteria.

1)    Research. The candidate should have at least two sole-authored, book-length historical studies from reputable publishing houses, preferably along with a body of other work that demonstrates the candidate’s status as a well-established professional historian. This other work could include edited or co-authored books, journal articles, book chapters, review-essays, and contributions to Internet projects, reference works, textbooks, exhibits or other endeavors seeking to bring historical scholarship to a wider public. Taken all together, the candidate’s research should make a significant contribution to the scholarship in his or her field(s) of study.

2)   Professional visibility. The candidate should have an ongoing research agenda and be an active member of the scholarly community, with a reputation that extends beyond the university. This can take many forms: participation as a presenter and/or commentator in scholarly conferences; the publication of book reviews; leadership in scholarly organizations and networks; membership on editorial and advisory boards; service as a peer-reviewer; and invitations to lecture at other institutions.

3)  Teaching. The candidate should have a well-established record of teaching excellence.

4)   University service. The candidate should have an active and ongoing record of service at the departmental and university levels. 

 

Departmental Promotion and Tenure Guidelines, Timelines, Suggestions, and Procedures

Assistant professors will be put up for promotion and tenure during their sixth year on the tenure clock. The process begins in the spring semester of their fifth year, when the tenured members of the department vote to form a Promotion and Tenure Committee (P&T) to begin putting together the candidate’s dossier. The P&T Committee generally consists of three tenured professors. In the fall of the sixth year, the tenured faculty vote on promotion and tenure based on the completed dossier. The Department Chair has a separate vote. These two votes along with the dossier are then submitted first to the tenure and promotion committee of the College of Arts & Sciences, then to the dean of the College of Arts & Sciences, then to the campus tenure and promotion committee of the University of Missouri, then to the Provost, and finally the Chancellor. All of these different levels vote on the tenure case and dossier. If the assistant professor candidate receives a negative vote at any of these levels, one has a right of appeal all the way up the chain of decision.

A parental or medical petition will stop the tenure clock for one year. Assistant Professors who are eligible may request up to two one-year stops of their tenure clock. In addition, the University of Missouri System has a standard parental or medical policy. Standard implementation of this policy in the Department of History leads to a one-semester leave that can be taken twice if the proper conditions exist during a given six-year period.

Assistant professors should also keep in mind the possibility of early promotion and tenure. If an assistant professor thinks that they are so far advanced in building their dossier for promotion and tenure, they should bring this possibility up with the two tenured professors evaluating their annual progress each spring. 

The dossier consists of an evaluation of research, teaching, and service. After the departmental P&T Committee is formed, outside evaluations of the candidate’s dossier are solicited. The list of potential evaluators is drawn from professors at peer institutions chosen by both the assistant professor candidate and the P&T Committee. Often the candidate comes up with a list of ten potential evaluators. The candidate also has the right to submit up to two names to bar from consideration as outside evaluators. The P&T Committee will often contact around eighteen potential evaluators, hoping to get a commitment from around eight. The candidate must write up statements of service, teaching, and research. The candidate must also provide a book, or a book manuscript and press contract if the book is still in production. The candidate should also provide offprints of all articles and book reviews that they have published.

The candidate must also provide a complete vita, identifying all publications, university and national service, conference presentations etc.

The Department of History requires a book for tenure and promotion to associate professor. The book should be in production at a reputable press (university presses inside the United States are often the safest choices) by the spring of the candidate’s fifth year. Remember that a copy of your book will be circulated to outside evaluators during the summer between your fifth and sixth year. The dossier is sent to outside reviewers during the May of your fifth year. Having the book between covers from your publisher on May 1 of your fifth year removes a lot of stress from the process.

The Department of History encourages assistant professors to strengthen their national reputation by attending national conferences and publishing an article or two based on their ongoing research project. Other departments on campus are more article-oriented than the Department of History, and having some published articles strengthens your dossier as it moves to the College of Arts and Sciences Tenure and Promotion Committee level. As for presentations at national conferences, remember that the University requires a number of letters from outside evaluators, different from those scholars who served on your dissertation committee. It is at these conferences that potential evaluators get to know your name, and you get to know them.

To encourage participation at conferences the department will provide an additional $500 toward an assistant professor’s E&E if they have a paper accepted at a national or international conference.

Assistant professors will be reviewed at the end of each calendar year. Each fall the Chair will assign a two-person committee in charge of the annual review. One member of the committee generally reviews the Assistant Professor’s research program, while the other member reviews their teaching and service. One member of the committee will attend a classroom lecture each year. These annual reviews are presented at the tenured faculty meeting during the spring semester annually. The Chair will provide a summary of the report to the Assistant Professor after the meeting. These reports, along with the Chair’s letters, will be included in the Assistant Professor’s personnel file with the Department of History.

Assistant professors should be prepared to provide the annual review committee with a copy of their vita; the University of Missouri My Vita annual report; and a short summary of their research, teaching, and service over the past calendar year. Emphasis should be placed on discussing, in concrete terms, the progress that has been made on the book manuscript and contacts with potential publishers.

At the end of the Assistant Professor’s third year, the annual review committee will provide a more thorough assessment of progress toward tenure.  In addition to the annual progress report, the committee will evaluate the progress of the manuscript toward publication. During this year, the Assistant Professor is strongly urged to discuss possible publication venues for the manuscript.  In general, Assistant Professors should aim to have their manuscript under review at a press by the end of their third year.

The Department of History provides all tenure-track assistant professors with a one-semester altered assignment that frees the colleague from all teaching duties. This semester can take place any time after the assistant professor’s second year. The scheduling of this should be discussed with the Department Chair.

Assistant Professors should be aware of how long the publication process takes. In general, it may over a year from initial submission to final publication for an article. Book publication is an even longer and more drawn out process. The process can take even longer if the manuscript is reviewed by more than one potential publisher. You should expect about a year between the completion of a manuscript and the signing of a contract. Once an author submits a final draft of manuscript already under contract, it can still take a press over a year to produce the actual monograph.

Links to useful sites

Department of History Promotion and Tenure Guidelines: Departmental Promotion & Tenure Guidelines

A&S Promotion and Tenure Guidelines: http://provost.missouri.edu/faculty/tenure.html

MU System Faculty Committees on Tenure: http://www.umsystem.edu/ums/rules/collected_rules/faculty/ch310/310.0 50_faculty_committees_on_tenure

MU System Faculty Leave: http://www.umsystem.edu/ums/rules/collected_rules/personnel/ch340/3 40.070_faculty_leave

UM System Parental Leave Policy: http://www.umsystem.edu/ums/rules/collected_rules/personnel/ch340/3 40.070_faculty_leave